logo (4K) Lane County Oregon Large Animal Vet

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Providing exceptional veterinary services for over 30 Years in the Willamette Valley

Dr. Wes Violet
Dr. Kris Willaman
Dr. Eleanor Teplin


255 Emerald Parkway
Creswell, OR 97426

541-895-5665
fax 541-895-5233


Office Hours:
Monday Friday | 8:00a.m. 5:30p.m. Saturday | 8:30a.m. 1:00pm.

24 Hour Large Animal Emergency Service
541-895-5665
541-747-1343


We are a proud member of the American Association of Equine Practitioners

Our Winter Newsletter Is Available, Click here to read!  South Willamette Veterinary Clinic is a full care equine, large animal, and small animal veterinary facility.  Dr. Wes Violet...
Our Winter Newsletter Is Available, Click here to read!  South Willamette Veterinary Clinic is a full care equine, large animal, and small animal veterinary facility.  Dr. Wes Violet...
Our Winter Newsletter Is Available, Click here to read!  South Willamette Veterinary Clinic is a full care equine, large animal, and small animal veterinary facility.  Dr. Wes Violet...

South Willamette Veterinary Clinic is a full care equine, large animal, and small animal veterinary facility.
Dr. Wes Violet and Dr. Kristine Willaman, a husband and wife team own and operate the South Willamette Veterinary Clinic in Creswell, Oregon. Together they have over 50 years of animal expertise and experience. They earned their veterinary degrees at The Ohio State University. In 2004, they built a 10,000 sq ft facility in Creswell, just south of Eugene in Lane County.

Our Philosophy: Continuity In Care And Service.
We have provided service for our clients and their animals in the southern Willamette Valley since 1981. We maintain the highest veterinary medical standards by continuing to reinvest in our education, staff, facility, and equipment.
Saturday Appointments!
We understand that you are busy during the week. Our clinic has always offered small and large animal Saturday appointments from 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. for your convenience. Call and make your appointment today!
24 HOUR LARGE ANIMAL EMERGENCY SERVICE
Equine and large animal emergency calls are answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. With our location adjacent to I-5, patients can be received at our hospital or our veterinary trucks can respond to field emergencies in Lane County, including all of the Eugene/ Springfield area as well as surrounding communities including: Junction City, Harrisburg, Veneta, Thurston, Marcola, Pleasant Hill, Creswell, Cottage Grove, Drain, and Yoncalla.
Phone: 541-895-5665 Fax: 541-895-5233
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There has been a recent outbreak of neurologic herpes virus (Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy or EHM) confirmed in the Pleasant Hill area. This resulted in the death of one severely affected horse and the quarantine of the barn. Currently, there are no other barns known to be affected.

Equine Herpes Virus 1 (EHV-1) is among the most common infectious diseases in horses. It more often causes a contagious respiratory disease known as rhinopneumonitis. It also can cause abortions in mares. Rarely, it is a more serious disease affecting the central nervous system. Unfortunately this can lead to progressive ataxia (incoordination) and complete recumbency (inability to rise).

Transmission usually occurs from infected horses through nasal secretions, placental tissues, and fomites (objects). The virus is fragile, does not live well outside the equine body, and is easily disinfected. Infected horses can shed virus from day one post infection but usually stop shedding virus within 2 to 3 weeks. Amount of virus shed has a lot to do with the host animal's immune system status.

Equine herpes virus is very much like other mammalian herpes viruses in that animals are infected at a very young age and then remain latently infected for life. In times of stress or in pregnancy the virus can recrudesce and horses will actively shed virus and infect other animals.

NEUROLOGIC FORM and CONTROL MEASURES

Probably a genetic mutation or variation in EHV- 1 has made it more pathogenic for the central nervous system in the last few years. The last major outbreak of EHM occurred in Ogden, Utah at the National Cutting Horse show in 2011 resulting in 13 dead horses.

It would be good practice to institute bio-security measures in all training and stabling facilities for the near future. This would include monitoring temperatures two times per day on all horses that have traveled recently.  Fever usually precedes the onset of neurologic signs in infected horses approximately four days. The febrile phase coincides with active viremia when the horses are most infective to others.

New arrivals or horses showing fevers should be isolated from the main population until an accurate diagnosis is established.

Vaccination protocols:                                                                                                                                   Vaccinations for EHV-1 have been somewhat controversial.Some have suggested that the over vaccinating with in activated rhino products, such as those found in 5 way vaccines may actually have contributed to the development of neurologic infections in horses. This is because they have not been proven to induce a cell mediated response which is thought to be more important in controlling neurologic infections.

Modified live rhinopneumonitis vaccines are thought to be more effective creating a cell mediated response. Therefore these vaccines should be more useful when dealing with a neurologic outbreak.
 
At SWVC, we have always advocated the use of modified live rhino vaccinations in our routine immunization protocols for higher risk horses. Another product stimulating cell mediated immunity in horses is Zylexis which is an inactivated sheep Parapox virus immunomodulator.  We have used Zylexis extensively in infectious virus situations.

 This newest outbreak serves as another reminder as the importance of instituting routine vaccination programs and bio-security measures with the guidance of your veterinarian. Our routine vaccination programs can be found on our website on the following link:

/shop/images/Vaccination_Protocols_updated_2013.pdf

In addition, here are two useful links on EHM, from UC Davis:
Awakening the Dormant Dragon: Neurological Form of Equine Herpesvirus-1 found at:
 
And from MSU School of Veterinary Medicine:
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS EQUINE HERPES VIRUS-1

 

 Please call if you have any questions.